Powerpoint Slides- Use them or Not?

 

For most large organizations it is almost a given that when you do a presentation it is expected that you will include powerpoint slides.  I believe powerpoint slides are becoming overused. Keep in mind that slides were originally introduced  to support your presentations not become them.

 

Overusing slides can hinder your effectiveness as a speaker in the following ways:

 

1)  You weaken your personal power to connect deeply with your audience. It is essential that you begin and end each slide transition by making eye contact with your audience. Then only glance at the slide to make sure it is the right one, and speak with your body facing square to the audience, maintaining eye contact. Unfortunately, this is rarely done resulting in a disconnect between the speaker and audience.

 

2)  You use it as your script instead of as your guide. This makes the flow less dynamic and usually more boring. If your audience is able to read what you are saying then you are being redundant and losing their attention. Using your slides as your script can serve to degrade the quality & credibility of your communication.

 

3)   You can get lost in the slides if something is out of order or unclear. Or if you have technology problems and are too reliant on the slides as your main message.  Fiddling with technology can be a huge distraction- remember this saying: “Anything that distracts, detracts.”

 

Stay tuned next week for more ways to use powerpoint to your advantage.  You will learn how to do what the most effective speakers do-  give as much of yourself to your listeners as possible.

 

Keep letting the REAL  U…..Speak Through!

Lisa Vanderkwaak M.Sc.

Certified  World Class Speaking Coach

REAL U Institute™

“Equipping you to Communicate with Passion, Purpose and Transformational Impact”

To book Lisa to speak at your next group training or as a Keynote,  contact her at www.REALUInstitute.com

 

 

 

 

 

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